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November 06, 2005

Civil Liberties.

Jeez, it doesn’t take long now does it. The Nu Labour authoritarians haven’t even got the Terrorism Bill through Parliament yet and they’re already talking of extending the crimes for which it can be used:

The Government will bring forward legislation in the New Year giving police new powers to disrupt the activities of human traffickers as well as “vicious” drug and gun gangs such as the Jamaican “Yardies”.

Mr Blair would like to see some of the powers now being proposed for use against terrorist suspects being available in the fight against such criminals. This could include greater use of phone-tapping, and suspects being held without charge for longer than the current 48-hour maximum.

Riiiight. Abolition of our rights to be used, in extremis, against only those who threaten the very basis of our society with violence. Before the thing is even passed he wants to use it on pimps. (Note that it will be pimps who are treated this way....for they won’t be sex-traffickers until it has been proved now will they?)

What next? Tax evaders? Booze cruisers?

Abolish Habeus Corpus for one charge and you’ve abolished it for all. As Mr S&M pointed out some months back, yes, there is a group of violent and desperate men who wish to steal your freedoms and liberty. They’re called the Government.

November 6, 2005 in Politics | Permalink

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» Elsewhere: Tim Worstall - Civil Liberties. from Not Little England
Tim's in a nice ranty mood this morning, and he's talking about one of our favourite topics... Unusually for him, he misses the economics and markets angle on the crimes he talks about, so I'll do it for him. [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 6, 2005 11:43:54 AM

» Tony Blair, the Serious Organsied Crime Agency and sex slave Human Trafficking from Spy Blog
Who thinks that the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) , which has not yet started work, has too few powers to investigate serious organised crime like sex slave human trafficking or gun smuggling or drug smuggling and distribution ? According... [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 6, 2005 12:14:13 PM

» Tony Blair, the Serious Organsied Crime Agency and sex slave Human Trafficking from Spy Blog
Who thinks that the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) , which has not yet started work, has too few powers to investigate serious organised crime like sex slave human trafficking or gun smuggling or drug smuggling and distribution ? According... [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 6, 2005 7:05:40 PM

» Tyranny of the majority from Stumbling and Mumbling
According to this YouGov poll (pdf), 72% of voters support extending the detention of suspected terrorists without charge to 90 days, albeit most of them subject to the approval of a judge.To which one can only reply: so what? 1. [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 7, 2005 1:26:58 PM

» Tony Blair, the Serious Organised Crime Agency and sex slave Human Trafficking from Spy Blog
Who thinks that the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) , which has not yet started work, has too few powers to investigate serious organised crime like sex slave human trafficking or gun smuggling or drug smuggling and distribution ? According... [Read More]

Tracked on Nov 10, 2005 7:17:41 PM

» Tony Blair, the Serious Organised Crime Agency and sex slave Human Trafficking from Spy Blog
Who thinks that the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) , which has not yet started work, has too few powers to investigate serious organised crime like sex slave human trafficking or gun smuggling or drug smuggling and distribution ? According... [Read More]

Tracked on Dec 6, 2005 4:51:48 PM

Comments

And in the U.S., too:

'As debate over government surveillance rages in adult society, the US Department of Justice is quietly enticing school districts to implement controversial technologies that monitor and track students. Critics fear these efforts will normalize electronic surveillance at an early age, conditioning young people to accept privacy violations while creating a market for companies that develop and sell surveillance systems.'

http://newstandardnews.net/content/index.cfm/items/2632

Posted by: Benjamin Melançon | Dec 1, 2005 5:32:00 AM